7. My Most Inspirational Colleague(s)!

It feels appropriate to write this post when #thankateacher is trending on my Twitter feed, as Tweachers are one of my inspirations. I mentioned in a previous post that, due to many factors, I very nearly left teaching two years ago. Then, to my utter surprise, I got a call from my current school asking if I was still looking for a job. I had questioned whether to accept, but to this day I think it was the best decision I have ever made.

I work in a school where I feel fortunate enough to count my colleagues among my closest friends. Not only that, I am in an environment where teaching talk is positive. It can be so easy to sit and moan and groan all day, and if you are in a more challenging school its probably cathartic to do that. But I am made to feel excited about teaching. I didn’t realise how valuable that was until it happened.

I now go to work feeling like I want to be a better teacher every day because of the inspiring people around me. We work in a 1:1 technology environment, and the enthusiasm of colleagues embracing this technology and really exploring its potential is simply amazing. I see people going above and beyond every day and doing it with a smile on their face without the slightest hint of resentment.

My department houses a head who leads by example and is one of the hardest working people I know. He is one of those people who just lives and breathes teaching, and students are consistently seen leaving his lessons in awe. He shares his successes and his failures, and throws himself in as one of the team. He is approachable and friendly, yet utterly professional and supportive when it matters. He is held in admiration by students and staff alike (though we can’t tell him too much, or his head won’t fit through the door!) and has shown me what a truly great leader looks like.

My department also houses a bunch of incredibly dedicated and hard working people. While I truly love them and am inspired by them all, one colleague in particular springs to mind. She fosters a love for learning and explores new ideas every day. Her dedication, organisation and spirit is something I admire and aspire to in my teaching, and it is down to her I revived this blog, have reactivated Twitter and and strive to be the best I can so I can give my kids even half of what she gives. I jokingly call her my work wife, but in reality I would be batting well above my weight.

I know this is an incoherent and sentimental post, and I know the people concerned will probably never read this. However, when #thankateacher is trending, I feel I should at least do my bit and thank the people who have made me fall in love with my profession, and make it my vocation.

Sincerely,

Thank you.

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Student Teacher Tips: Lesson Planning

Planning is a huge part of a teaching career and one that can make or break your classroom resolve. Planning 45 hours of valuable content a fortnight sounds like a mammoth task, not to mention all that planning is done outside of school hours. But, with some practice and learning from mistakes, things become very natural very quickly. These tips have worked well in my experience, so here goes with some single (short term) lesson planning basics!

1. Work Backwards

This was the most valuable thing my mentor taught me during my training (and she taught me a LOT of valuable stuff!) It’s so much easier to plan once you know what you are planning towards. Decide on your aim for the lesson and work the steps backwards until you get to where the students are now. This helps with your pacing as well; 27 steps is too much to cover in a lesson so you need to make your objective more achievable. One step is not enough. It’s surprising how frequently you find your objectives are misjudged and this really helps. For tiered learning objectives, differentiate up by creating development and extension tasks (check out my post on SOLO Taxonomy for an introduction to how you could do this and make it valuable.)

2. Have Clear Objectives

Again, my post on SOLO covers an aspect of this, but this works itself out if you use the method above. Make it clear to yourself and to your students what you want to achieve. Write it in simple, students friendly terms as well. They should be easy to refer to and understandable in order to make them really valuable, which leads on to the next tip:

3. Make Checks Valuable

Aiming to regularly check progress in lessons is a hot topic at the moment, but if you are not careful you can lose lesson content and spend the whole time checking and evaluating. Progress checks are important in lessons, but make sure they are valuable for the students, rather than just a ten second marker to reassure yourself the class is awake and half engaged. This often happens in observations, so rather than being caught out develop a repertoire of quick progress checks which are useful for students and encourage them to achieve the most they can in your lessons. They will take them more seriously if they see the benefit of them and you won’t get that awkward see of thumbs up when you know things are not as rosy.

4. Keep it Simple

The biggest criticism student teachers face is that they try to cram too much into a lesson. You will be fit to burst with fabulous and crazy lesson ideas which WILL revolutionise the way your subject is taught in a Dead Poet’s Society style of eureka, but how about you eek those great ideas out across several lessons. Again, planning backwards with regular checks means no more than five tasks absolute maximum could fit into a lesson. Depending on the length of task, it may well be less. Keep the base lesson simple and use the differentiating up to generate exciting extras your students can do if they finish the core tasks. This enhances the learning experience of brighter students but keeps the core understandable and taught well, meaning you know at the end of the lesson where every student is in relation to your objectives and hopefully (if your feedback methods are particularly strong) how to help them progress further next time. And that, in a nutshell, is teaching. Wizzes and bangs are fun optional extras.

5. Make Things Explicit

This is especially important when you are being observed, but in terms of day to day teaching students like to know what they are doing and why they are doing it. Be as open and explicit as possible about this. Be clear and open with your learning objectives. Be clear and open as to what you expect from a task by modelling it. Be clear and open about how to create good work by generating success criteria with your class. If you’re being observed, be clear and open about why you have included activities and elements in your lesson in your planning. Students appreciate clarity and transparency and it breeds respect for many. And remember, modelling does not have to be done in person. You can get students to scan a QR code to watch a demo video you found on Youtube, or read through another student example to check for good points and errors etc. Modelling is one of the most effective teaching and learning practices, so get used to making it fun and varied because it is likely you will be using it a lot.

So that’s my tips for single lesson planning basics. If you want to see more lesson planning posts you can check out my basics for mid term planning here and SOLO Taxonomy objectives here, and if you want me to talk further on any of the points mentioned above then comment down below or tweet me using the links. Thanks for stopping by, and happy planning!

 

 

Planning: The Basics

lesson-plans-and-aims

At this time of year, ITT sign offs are afoot and people are finding themselves becoming shiny NQTs with shiny new jobs and shiny new classes. I remember vividly this time last year – my timetable had been filled with KS4 and KS5 who were no longer in school, so I found myself with oodles of time (by this point there were not many PPA tasks I could not do in under 40 minutes) and the prospect of a new job at a new school and new texts and schemes of work to get my head around. I was in the fortunate position to go to a school that was quite open to teachers putting their own stamp on things – I LOVE to plan and find it one of the best parts of the job (yes, I know I am weird, but all that colour coding and curriculum mapping is just so much FUN!) In this post I thought I would take you through the basics of what I do when planning. I will eventually do a series of posts on long, mid and short term planning but this is the skeleton of my planning process.

Continue reading “Planning: The Basics”