3 Revision Strategies for Last Minute Lessons

It’s the time of year when exams are looming and workload seems at an all-time high. Revision sessions, extra marking and last minute interventions take their toll on your time and energy. It’s all for the best cause and with the best of intentions, but it can be a lot to deal with.

This year, I am teaching Literature to three year groups. I have loved it, and feel immensely lucky in an age of English Language priority to be able to do so. However, the revision stress and pressure is looming (we have had over 100 students from various years at revision regularly), and I have found myself searching for ideas for revision tasks and lessons that let the students feel they have really made some progress, but are not too laborious to put together. My top three are below.

1. Quote Quilts

Adapted from a History and MFL idea I saw on Twitter, these work really well for essay practice without the write-up (and the resultant written marking). Feedback can be verbal and quick, making students feel they have progressed and learnt in a faster loop than a traditional written response. I have used these as preparation before an exam style write-up, and have also used them to prepare quotes for a competitive ‘quote tennis’ style match, pitching half the room against the other.

The concept is simple: take a grid (4×4 for the whole text, or you could do 2×2 or 3×3 for individual characters) and write a list of themes or essay question topics. Colour code the topic list as a key and fill in the grid with quotes. Then, colour each quote with all the colours you can link it to. The more colourful the quilt, the better your quotes!

quilt inspiration

A history themed inspiration from Karen Knight (@KKNteachlearn) on Twitter)

This has been good to do in groups on big bits of paper, or individually to revise quotes and think critically about them.

2. Revision Clocks

 

revision clock

Picture from Slideshare

I discovered these via Twitter (again) and they are brilliant! If you have loads of things students want to cover in a lesson, or you want to cover all the characters or themes in a text, one sheet and five-minute increments make even the rowdiest of classes focus. It’s really clear to see what segments students are confident in and where they need a little more help, and they have a piece of revision they can be really proud of at the end. they can be used in a number of ways, but here are some I have tried:

Student-led (individual): Students are given the timings by the teacher and simply fill each segment in with what they know. They can have a minute at the start of each segment for questions, then it’s them and their individual knowledge. This works best with success criteria (eg. aim for 3 quotes, 3 points and 3 links to context in each segment).

Student-led (group): Using fewer segments (6 instead of twelve) students complete the clock but all start at different points. Every five minutes they swap their work with the person next to them, or around a small group. This means they will have a mixture of their own work and others’ ideas on their sheet at the end. it also encourages them to further others’ ideas and think beyond the obvious.

Teacher-led: The class decide the topics they are unsure about and the teacher delivers notes covering these in five-minute segments, with time for questions in each bit too. This allows for a structured approach, constant motivation due to time constraint, and everyone to have lesson time on something they want to cover.

I’ve found these particularly useful with lower sets, but higher sets have found it good to take home and use in a structured revision hour.

3. Who Am I?

post it notes.jpgI must admit, my penchant for colour coding and stationery has garnered me a bit of a reputation in my department, but I do love a good post-it note. They are just so useful. And that’s all you need for this game (which has saved me on numerous occasions when half the year group has shown up for revision and I’ve planned for 25 students). Students simply write a character name, theme or essay topic on the post-it note, and stick it on another’s head. That student then has to ask questions and guess what their note says, but the only information they will have from others will be in the form of quotes. This has kept students who have finished early amused for a long time, and they ended up writing and guessing things like ‘The Boss’ and ‘Candy’s Dog’ and ‘The girl from Weed’ which was pretty impressive.

So there you have it! My top three newfangled revision methods for this season. What revision methods are you enjoying at the moment? Have you discovered anything new? Let me know, and thanks for stopping by!

 

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10. 5, 4, 3, 2, 1

5 random facts about myself:

  • I have written several screenplays, nearly a whole novel and some monologues
  • I have different coloured eyes
  • I worked on BBC’s Hinterland
  • I have performed across the UK doing improvised comedy
  • My dad’s name is Will Power (seriously)

4 things on my bucket list:

  • To visit Italy
  • To get my book published
  • To have children
  • To launch a full range of illustrated products

3 things I hope for this year:

  • To get enough students together for a GCSE Media class
  • To get our TED style talk initiative to take off
  • To live up to my role and support others through the year

2 things that have made me laugh or cry as an educator:

  • Laugh: student logic and general awkward navigation of being teenagers. There are so many stories, I wouldn’t even know where to start!
  • Laugh/cry (in a positive way!): student enthusiasm for little clubs or idiosyncrasies in lessons. I have a Mario mushroom I throw around and use for quick fire grammar games. it was an off the cuff activity which has now become a permanent feature because of the boundless joy and excitement when the ‘Grammarshroom’ is brought out!
  • Bonus: I get weirdly emotional sometimes when speaking to parents about how well their child is doing and if they say anything nice to me. I think I just don’t really know how to respond and my body just goes into reaction overdrive and start welling up! I even get it if a child emails to say thank you or just says thank you at the end of the lesson as they leave. It’s all very strange!

1 thing I wish more people knew about me:

  • I am massively insecure, and worry constantly I am not doing a good job. I sometimes overcompensate for this and try to mask it with bounciness and cheer, but it overwhelms me every so often. I wish people knew that’s why I am the way I am and why I run things by people so much. I just hope it makes my habits less annoying, or at least provides a reason for them!

There you have it! If you are thinking of blogging, you could maybe try this one as a first post. It’s a pretty easy one to write, and it can be quite short too! That’s all from me, so thanks for stopping by!

Friday 5: Alternative Feedback Methods

Being an English Teacher is tough for many reasons, but among the teaching community the primary source of contention is the marking. The never ending ever growing truly relentless marking.

Exam season seems to bring out the sadism of the job. Just how much red penning can you handle before you crack? It isn’t just English, but from my personal experience the constant correcting of repetitive mistakes and hours writing developed feedback can take its toll: especially when students get books or papers back and all they look at is the number, or the letter, or nothing at all. Certainly not your carefully crafted comments.

As I teach a lot of KS3 and my priority has to be shifted to examination classes this term, I have spent some time collating methods which reduce the teacher workload when it comes to marking books, exams or other forms of student work. These are not new or groundbreaking but they are things I didn’t think of until someone mentioned them or I discovered them online. I am still hunting for more ideas, so if you use something which works well please let me know through Twitter or by commenting below!

 

1. Whole Class Feedback Sheets

This gem of an idea came from @RSillmanEnglish, a fab colleague and fiend of mine. She saw it on Twitter and decided to try it with her GCSE exam class. I looked into it and became hooked. It gives you the opportunity to provide detailed feedback, praise and address concerns without writing the same thing fifteen times. I designed my own class feedback sheets with STAR (Solo Time for Achievement through Reflection. DIRT for most people) tasks so the next lesson I had with the students was already planned and differentiated accordingly. I love them so much, I even developed a student feedback and reflection sheet for my exam classes. You can download any of this stuff for free on TES

2. Stamping Approach

This has worked pretty well for my younger classes, but requires a bit of set up. My students have written the writing success criteria for any piece of work in their books, using their two hands as a key for the two main aspects of writing: content and accuracy. I have a stamp with two hands on it. All I need to do now is to skim read their drafts and RAG each of the fingers of the hand. Students can then look back at the hands and work out what they need to work on. Quick but detailed, and students love having little hands stamped on their work (for some weird reason).

3. Highlighting

This is a tried and tested method which works well with lower attaining classes as it focuses them a little more. It was first brought to my attention by my Head of Faculty and I have been using it ever since. We use an orange highlighter (colours are, of course, interchangeable) to run through work and highlight any errors. This can be done when books are collected or, more conveniently, can be done whilst students are drafting. Students then need to address each highlighted word/mark/area and tick when they have done so. This can then be verified by the teacher. As well as this, we use a green highlighter to identify some great moments in the work. A confidence boosting DIRT/STAR task can then be to get the student to justify why we have highlighted the particular line.

4. Student Selector

This is not a feedback method as such, but feeds into one nicely. It’s as simple as it sounds: select three to five students at random at the end of each lesson. I do it on a fortnightly cycle so I end up marking everyone’s book in a fortnight. I then highlight or do a simple book check checklist to see if they are on track. The fact it is random means it keeps everyone on their toes, but it also means you are not taking in 30 books to mark in an evening. Instead you have a maximum of 25 and, if you keep up the routine, a maximum of two weeks’ work to check through. On busy weeks, I simply stick a red, yellow or green dot on the front of the book to indicate how the student is getting on. I then have a DIRT/STAR card which corresponds to the colours, getting the student to reflect on work and presentation and improve them. This is often set as a homework or starter task.

5. Kaizena

This is another fabulous discovery from the wonderful @RSillmanEnglish and is a really exciting way to give feedback. It is a web and downloadable app and allows you to leave comments on student work, which is uploaded from a digital document or a photograph. But here’s the really exciting bit. It allows you to leave voice annotations and links to video tutorials. This means you can explain corrections, rather than having that frantic feedback lesson. You know, where you feel pulled in all directions by students who cannot be bothered to read you comments, or who don’t understand your illegible scrawl. Considering we make video tutorials for students already, it also makes sense to be able to link them to work where the content is needed and will directly help the student to improve. Best of all, it syncs with Google Classroom. Winner!

 

These are the methods I am trialling and experimenting with so far. I hope to update this post with pictures once I am back in school and can get hold of some good examples. I hope this is useful and you can take something away from it – what do you do to alleviate marking workload? What methods work best for yoU? Let me know, and, as always, thanks for stopping by!

Student Teacher Tips: Being a ‘Popular’ Teacher

One of the stranger (and yet still common) concerns amongst student teachers and new teachers is the good old playground debate of popularity. No matter how much we deny it, all teachers secretly long for that effortless rapport, that ‘Dead Poets Society’ moment with our classes. In practice, it’s not that easy and requires one thing student teachers lack with their classes: time. However, all is not lost, and with a little effort here and there a good relationship can be established with your pupils. Advise from making you feel good, it helps with engagement, behaviour and respect.

Now, here’s all the disclaimers. This has been a weakness of mine, and certainly was at the start of my teaching career. With trickier classes during my NQT year, I devoted little to no time fostering any relationships in a constant battle to gain any sort of respect or authority. So I am no expert. However, this year I promised myself I would get this right, if nothing else. I prefaced these approaches with a no nonsense attitude to uniform, written work presentation, lateness and low level disruption. Not smiling before Christmas may be a little extreme, but establishing yourself as the authority figure reaps its own rewards in terms of respect. No student likes a pushover teacher, even the naughtier ones. Some days I feel like the most unpopular teacher ever, even if the lesson before had been awesome. Some classes don’t buy into any of these approaches either. But, overall, I feel I have a better relationship this year with my students than any previous years. That has to count for something. 

Be Efficient

The bedrock of popularity is respect. Students will respect you if you prove to them you can do your job and do it well. This means having your paperwork in order, sticking to deadlines, keeping promises and making them feel they are getting good value for their time. Setting this up at the start of the year means that if you find you need to extend a marking deadline or change something later on, they will be far more understanding as they know you are likely to have a genuine reason for doing so.

‘But students should have respect for us no matter what! Why should we  work to earn it?’ That may be the case. Students may already have respect for you. They may not. But you need to work to keep it and, if you lose it, it’s going to take a LOT of work to get it back. Think of it from their point of view. If your boss demanded with respect and gave you nothing to indicate he or she should earn it, resentment will start to build. Show them you are doing your job well and they will thank you for it.

Be Enthusiastic

You came into this profession to spread knowledge, specifically about your subject. You are a brain evangelist and you should exault your scripture to your masses. You love your subject enough to dedicate you life to it, so show them! One of the most fun lessons I’ve taught this year had no flashy apps, no six way differentiated small groups. It was me, a whiteboard, several coloured whiteboard pens and a slightly hysterical level of enthusiasm  for sentence types. Students started by listening purely because it was a little comical, but several stick men  and sentence diagrams later they went away with a sense of the differences between a compound and complex sentence. More to the point, they went away knowing that I flipping love sentence construction. I may be weird to them, but enthisiasm is infectious and respect builds further when they see you love what you do.

Be Honest (Within Reason)

This doesn’t mean you sit and spill what happened over your weekend in minute detail. It means being honest in the little things. If you make a mistake, apologise. If you don’t know something, admit it and demonstrate good practice when looking up information. If a student tells you something you don’t know, thank them rather than resenting them. If they think you respect them and the knowledge they have, they will respect your opinion more.

Be Interested

At any one time you will have about 30 individuals in your room with their own stories and backgrounds. You may know their FFT prediction, their working at grades and their strengths and weaknesses in terms of your subject in minute detail, but do you know them?   Younger students especially are keen to share, and you can develop a relationship through interest in their stories. Of course, there has to be a limit and you don’t want your whole lesson taken up with stories of family trips at the weekend. When it’s appropriate, listen. Take a real interest. Ask questions and follow things up. Showing students how to listen and respond in conversation is a valuable lesson in itself, and treating students as individual people does no end of good.

Embrace Yourself

You are a unique and influential being. You will probably remember certain teachers at school and they are likely to be the quirky ones. The ones who allowed you to scratch between the surface and reveal the human underneath. Give them a hint of what you are about. Music you like. Films you watch. Hobbies you have. Books you read. All of that seems small and silly, but to a young person sharing hours of their day with you, it can mean a lot. Show them you are more than your job and more than just some initials on their timetable.

 

What at do you do in your classroom to build relationships? Do you have any great approaches to building relationships? How important do you think relationships are in a classroom?

 

Thanks for stopping by!

Friday 5: Resources for Teaching Shakespeare

ShakespeareTragedyI’ll be making a video to go with this at some point, but as I am teaching Shakespeare to two classes I thought I would share now some of the resources I have come across that have really helped with bringing the plays to life. Continue reading “Friday 5: Resources for Teaching Shakespeare”

Planning: The Basics

lesson-plans-and-aims

At this time of year, ITT sign offs are afoot and people are finding themselves becoming shiny NQTs with shiny new jobs and shiny new classes. I remember vividly this time last year – my timetable had been filled with KS4 and KS5 who were no longer in school, so I found myself with oodles of time (by this point there were not many PPA tasks I could not do in under 40 minutes) and the prospect of a new job at a new school and new texts and schemes of work to get my head around. I was in the fortunate position to go to a school that was quite open to teachers putting their own stamp on things – I LOVE to plan and find it one of the best parts of the job (yes, I know I am weird, but all that colour coding and curriculum mapping is just so much FUN!) In this post I thought I would take you through the basics of what I do when planning. I will eventually do a series of posts on long, mid and short term planning but this is the skeleton of my planning process.

Continue reading “Planning: The Basics”