10. 5, 4, 3, 2, 1

5 random facts about myself:

  • I have written several screenplays, nearly a whole novel and some monologues
  • I have different coloured eyes
  • I worked on BBC’s Hinterland
  • I have performed across the UK doing improvised comedy
  • My dad’s name is Will Power (seriously)

4 things on my bucket list:

  • To visit Italy
  • To get my book published
  • To have children
  • To launch a full range of illustrated products

3 things I hope for this year:

  • To get enough students together for a GCSE Media class
  • To get our TED style talk initiative to take off
  • To live up to my role and support others through the year

2 things that have made me laugh or cry as an educator:

  • Laugh: student logic and general awkward navigation of being teenagers. There are so many stories, I wouldn’t even know where to start!
  • Laugh/cry (in a positive way!): student enthusiasm for little clubs or idiosyncrasies in lessons. I have a Mario mushroom I throw around and use for quick fire grammar games. it was an off the cuff activity which has now become a permanent feature because of the boundless joy and excitement when the ‘Grammarshroom’ is brought out!
  • Bonus: I get weirdly emotional sometimes when speaking to parents about how well their child is doing and if they say anything nice to me. I think I just don’t really know how to respond and my body just goes into reaction overdrive and start welling up! I even get it if a child emails to say thank you or just says thank you at the end of the lesson as they leave. It’s all very strange!

1 thing I wish more people knew about me:

  • I am massively insecure, and worry constantly I am not doing a good job. I sometimes overcompensate for this and try to mask it with bounciness and cheer, but it overwhelms me every so often. I wish people knew that’s why I am the way I am and why I run things by people so much. I just hope it makes my habits less annoying, or at least provides a reason for them!

There you have it! If you are thinking of blogging, you could maybe try this one as a first post. It’s a pretty easy one to write, and it can be quite short too! That’s all from me, so thanks for stopping by!

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7. My Most Inspirational Colleague(s)!

It feels appropriate to write this post when #thankateacher is trending on my Twitter feed, as Tweachers are one of my inspirations. I mentioned in a previous post that, due to many factors, I very nearly left teaching two years ago. Then, to my utter surprise, I got a call from my current school asking if I was still looking for a job. I had questioned whether to accept, but to this day I think it was the best decision I have ever made.

I work in a school where I feel fortunate enough to count my colleagues among my closest friends. Not only that, I am in an environment where teaching talk is positive. It can be so easy to sit and moan and groan all day, and if you are in a more challenging school its probably cathartic to do that. But I am made to feel excited about teaching. I didn’t realise how valuable that was until it happened.

I now go to work feeling like I want to be a better teacher every day because of the inspiring people around me. We work in a 1:1 technology environment, and the enthusiasm of colleagues embracing this technology and really exploring its potential is simply amazing. I see people going above and beyond every day and doing it with a smile on their face without the slightest hint of resentment.

My department houses a head who leads by example and is one of the hardest working people I know. He is one of those people who just lives and breathes teaching, and students are consistently seen leaving his lessons in awe. He shares his successes and his failures, and throws himself in as one of the team. He is approachable and friendly, yet utterly professional and supportive when it matters. He is held in admiration by students and staff alike (though we can’t tell him too much, or his head won’t fit through the door!) and has shown me what a truly great leader looks like.

My department also houses a bunch of incredibly dedicated and hard working people. While I truly love them and am inspired by them all, one colleague in particular springs to mind. She fosters a love for learning and explores new ideas every day. Her dedication, organisation and spirit is something I admire and aspire to in my teaching, and it is down to her I revived this blog, have reactivated Twitter and and strive to be the best I can so I can give my kids even half of what she gives. I jokingly call her my work wife, but in reality I would be batting well above my weight.

I know this is an incoherent and sentimental post, and I know the people concerned will probably never read this. However, when #thankateacher is trending, I feel I should at least do my bit and thank the people who have made me fall in love with my profession, and make it my vocation.

Sincerely,

Thank you.

Reflective Teaching Blogging Challenge

To kick off the new year, I thought I would attempt a blogging challenge. I am notoriously bad at these, so don’t hold out too much hope, but if anyone wants to join in then link your posts down below or under the relevant post so we can share ideas!

Student Teacher Tips: Observing Lessons

It’s looming, and with a blend of trepidation and excitement ITT students around the country and starting to turn their focus to September. It’s new term time! Which means this blog is starting up again in ernest. I am going to do another post on my summer goals, but the summer has been restful and eventful with many wonderful things happening. Among these things has been my dear husband’s preparations for his ITT in Biology. I’m very excited to learn many things from him as he is completing a PGCE and my training was on the job through School Direct, as well as supporting him in a truly empathetic way. It is one of the most varied, intense and wonderful careers anyone can choose, so I’m thrilled for him and the year ahead.

Leading on from this, I am writing these posts for the gear up back to school and hope to cover some of the main events and concerns surrounding the basics of ITT. Today, we are talking about observing lessons. Observing lessons is one of the most important things you do during your ITT and something you have precious little time to do throughout the rest of your career. As such, it’s important to make the most of it and gain as much as possible for yourself and your practice. Here are some tips to make that happen:

1.Dress Smart

This is probably obvious, but whenever there are children on site in a school the rule of thumb is to dress professionally. There will of course be exceptions, but just because you are not teaching does not mean you can rock up in Uggs and jeans. Keep it smart – remember, you could be teaching this class at some point.

2.Notes Notes Notes

It’s likely you will be given some sort of formulaic observation form for your teaching file. As well as filling this out, keep a notebook on hand and note down anything you felt worked well or could be recycled when you take the stage. This could be behaviour management techniques, starters, plenaries, assessment and progress checks, even formatting worksheets. If there is a worksheet you really like, see if there is a spare copy you can have at the end of the lesson. Nearly all of my teaching ideas have stemmed from observation rather than theory because you can see them in situ and in practice.

3.Student Centric Focus

No doubt your training school will give you various foci for your observations, but a great one to do is to imagine you are the student in the lesson. After observing and understanding the components of a lesson, observe the students and see what their experience of the lesson is like. You will most likely be observing the subject you are teaching and therefore have a vested interest in it, so think for a moment about the kids who cannot stand your beloved specialism. How are they dealing with the lesson? Taking this one step further, ask to have a copy of the resources one lesson and take part as if you were a student, thinking about whether there is support as well as challenge. If it’s possible. try to complete this exercise in another subject area as well so you can feel what it is like to be taking part in a lesson completely outside your comfort zone. I did this in my school last year and it was a really interesting experience.

4.Get Involved

After you have seen a few lessons and are getting the hang of things, try to get involved. You will find this helps with your energy levels (sitting in the same place all day taking notes is surprisingly exhausting) and helps you engage more with the lesson. Offer to help handing out resources, circulate and listen in on group work and ask students about their experience (ask permission first as some staff may not be comfortable with you doing this). If you can get involved, it not only gets you talking to the students and considering pupil voice, it also makes it clear to them you are part of the teaching profession. Most of them will be used to observers talking to them during performance management, so you will immediately gain a sense of status in their eyes by doing this. Just remember – take what some of them say with a pinch of salt and avoid taking them off task for too long – we all know those plucky few who like to show off to newcomers or ask pertinent personal questions!

5.Be Positive

No matter how long you have been teaching, it is stressful to have someone else in your classroom judging what you do. Even in a non judgemental situation like this one, it can feel invasive in a way. Nothing makes signing up to observations more unpleasant than someone walking in and criticising left right and centre when they have not done the job. Be polite, thankful and courteous – you are not there to judge how good the lesson is because, to be brutally honest, you don’t know yet. You are there to gain knowledge, ideas and experience of a classroom environment, so focus on that. Even if the room caught fire and there was a scissor fight, some element of the planning or management of the tricky situation will provide you with a learning experience because these are situations you could find yourself in and you are seeing those same situations dealt with by a more experience colleague. There was a lovely feedback system for peer observations in my training school this year; ‘thank you’ postcards with sentence starters such as ‘thank you for the privilege of letting me observe your lesson. I particularly enjoyed…’ As teachers, we tend to be our own worst critics, so being encouraging and positive in a specific and helpful (rather than gushy) way is really important as an observer. It is a rare privilege to watch a colleague at work and it should be treated so, because one day you will be that colleague!

This series of posts simply contains things I found useful in my limited experience. They are in no way comprehensive and I would love to hear what your experiences are and what your top tips are so we can start a discussion. If you are a trainee teacher preparing to start or having just started, what are your concerns? What would you like me to cover in other posts? Let me know down below or through Twitter and, as always, thanks for stopping by!

Friday 5: Uses for Sticky Notes in the Classroom

MAY15_26_456701506Being a complete stationery addict, it’s no surprise I am pretty obsessed with sticky notes. Sat there in big colourful blocks and available in a host of hues and shapes, they bring vibrance and life to my otherwise dreary planner and make my never ending to do list a little more palatable. Continue reading “Friday 5: Uses for Sticky Notes in the Classroom”